Following successful trials, the system is set to be available commercially, and could one day form part of the medical kit in every frontline unit.

Dr Neal Smith, Capability Adviser, Medical Sciences, from Dstl, said: “While this technique may not be right for every injury, it is a hugely important innovation that could save the limbs of many more of those affected. It’s a fantastic example of where we work with academics to fund life-changing research which has been turned into a product to improve the quality of life of those injured in service.”

Professor Terry Gourlay, Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Strathclyde University, said: “We looked at every stage of the journey an injured soldier follows after injury to ensure our solution was designed specifically for them.

“The system we have developed is essentially a life-support system for the limb which gives doctors precious time to attempt to repair damage while ensuring the safety of the patient.”

Professor Gourlay’s team also pioneered the blood salvaging technique known as HemoSep, which allows blood lost in surgery to be transfused directly back to the patient, reducing the need to donated blood. A military version of the HemoSep project was also funded by Dstl.

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